Contacting legislators  2012

(Please direct feedback to wwhipple3@verizon.net)   

SAFE periodically contacts members of Congress, primarily those from Delaware, with timely comments re subjects on our agenda.  We typically send one-page letters, with references to the SAFE Website for further details. See the recap of letters below.

Individual SAFE members also contact legislators on their own, e.g., by e-mail (through their respective Websites) or telephone.  For convenient reference, here is some contact information for members of Congress from Delaware.

121012
SECURE AMERICA’S FUTURE ECONOMY, advocating smaller, more focused, less costly government since 1996, now you can follow us on Twitter

Dear Senator Carper [also Sen. Coons, Rep. Carney]

For information: SAFE column re what to do about the fiscal cliff published in Del. State News, 12/10/12. http://bit.ly/VMFxiv

William Whipple III

Secure America's Future Economy

December 11, 2012

Dear Mr. Whipple,

Thank you for taking the time to contact me regarding sequestration. I appreciate your input on this important subject.

As you know, sequestration is a process of automatic, across-the-board spending reductions. The sequestration was included as an enforcement mechanism in the Budget Control Act of 2011 should the Joint Select Committee of Deficit Reduction fail to reduce the deficit by at least $1.2 trillion over the next ten years. Due to the failure of the Joint Select Committee in November 2011, the first automatic spending cuts under the Budget Control Act are scheduled to take effect on January 2, 2013. 

Since my arrival in Congress, the people of Delaware have been demanding that Democrats and Republicans work together to address the precarious fiscal situation the country faces. To that end, I have spoken repeatedly on the House floor, written letters to House and Senate leadership, and had dozens of conversations with members in both parties in an attempt to generate support for a comprehensive, bipartisan agreement. 

During this year's budget process, I was one of 38 members to vote for a budget proposal introduced by Congressman Jim Cooper (D-TN) and Congressman Steven LaTourette (R-OH) modeled after the Simpson-Bowles deficit reduction plan. The Cooper-LaTourette proposal was a balanced, comprehensive and fair approach to responsibly reduce our deficit. While the proposal included revenue increases and spending cuts, they most importantly would have preserved critical investments in America's future without undermining our fragile economy.

As we near the January 2nd deadline, I will continue to work with my colleagues in the House to devise a responsible deficit reduction plan that will preserve crucial programs and make investments in our economy. I appreciate your taking the time to share your thoughts with me on this matter. I take seriously the trust Delawareans have placed in me and my responsibility to represent them in Congress, and I look forward to serving you in the coming years. 

Sincerely,

John Carney

Member of Congress

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112612
Secure America’s Future Economy Advocating smaller, more focused, less costly government since 1996

November 26, 2012

Via Fax: Representatives Boehner, Pelosi, Brady, Camp, Cantor, Carney, Dicks, Hensarling, Levin, Rogers, Ryan, & Van Hollen; Senators Reid, McConnell, Baucus, Carper, Casey, Coburn, Cochran, Conrad, Coons, Cornyn, Hatch, Inouye, Johnson, Kyl, Lee, Murray, Rubio, Sessions, Toomey, & Wyden

If lenders conclude the US national debt is out of control and demand much higher interest rates, this country could face a catastrophic financial crisis. See Senator Tom Coburn’s book, “The Debt Bomb,” and Senator Mike Lee’s Washington Times op-ed (11/23/12), “After fiscal cliff comes fiscal avalanche.”  To get back on track, it is essential to deal with the fiscal cliff in a constructive way.  Our recommendations follow (the 11/26/12 blog entry on SAFE’s website provides further discussion):

TAX INCREASES – Most observers agree taxes should not be raised by half a trillion dollars next year, but this will happen unless Congress acts.  Accordingly, we recommend that only some of the scheduled tax increases - expiration of payroll tax holiday ($125B), “tax extenders” ($40B), & 2009 stimulus ($11B); new Obamacare taxes ($36B) - be allowed to take effect; and others - expiration of Bush tax cuts ($156B) & accelerated business expensing ($48B); no patch of Alternative Minimum Tax ($88B); estate tax increase ($10B) - be blocked.

Then the tax system needs to be overhauled from stem to stern. SAFE’s tax proposal (http://www.s-a-f-e.org/the_simple_tax.htm), would lower income tax rates (but the tax table would remain progressive), abolish nearly all income tax preferences and the AMT, drastically simplify business taxes, and repeal the federal estate tax.  Other thoughtful tax proposals deserve consideration as well.  It’s time for the members of the House Ways and Means Committee to roll up their sleeves and get to work.

SPENDING CUTS – Although the primary cause of the fiscal problem is out of control spending (current and promised), fiscal cliff negotiators have spent most of their time talking about raising taxes.  We think a basic change in attitude is needed, and here are some ideas for bringing it about. (A) Lift the sequester of defense funds that is scheduled to start 1/1/13, as the military budget has already been trimmed, but enforce the sequester of domestic discretionary spending.  (B) Ensure budgets will be approved on a regular basis, in accordance with congressional rules, by providing that members of Congress and the White House will not be paid during any fiscal year until a budget is in place. (C) Establish a Joint Entitlements Committee tasked with finding ways to reduce Social Security & healthcare outlays; instruct the JEC not to recommend any tax increases and give it a reporting deadline of June 1, 2014.

DEBT LIMIT INCREASE – The current $16.4T debt limit will reportedly need to be increased by mid February.  Let’s say the increase will be $1T.  What, if anything, should be required in return?

According to Speaker John Boehner (Peterson Foundation, 5/15/12), the next debt limit increase should be accompanied by an equal or greater amount of spending cuts and/or tax “reforms,” just as happened (counting the sequester, which some people are still fighting) in 2011.  To this end, we would suggest that the agreed amount be recovered through the congressional budget process.  Thus, the fiscal year 2014 budget should provide for verifiable spending cuts (over 10 years) of the remainder of the $1.2T sequester from 2011 plus $1T to cover the debt limit increase in 2013.

IN CLOSING – The foregoing recommendations may seem difficult from a political standpoint, but the fiscal problem is deadly serious and it cannot be fixed without major changes.  We would urge that you at least consider these ideas, and hopefully implement them.  If SAFE can help in any way, e.g., by answering questions or testifying, please let us know.

Sincerely,

William Whipple III

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101612
SECURE AMERICA’S FUTURE ECONOMY, advocating smaller, more focused, less costly government since 1996, now you can follow us on Twitter

October 16, 2012

Dear Senator Carper:

#In combination, these posts sum up our thoughts on the key issue of the upcoming elections – rebooting the economy and averting a fiscal meltdown:

•Jobs plan is posted on SAFE’s main-page. http://www.s-a-f-e.org/

•SAFE’s jobs manifesto: everyone wants more jobs and here is how to get them. Blog 2012 (10/15/12) [Blog page]

#We would also welcome any thoughts you may have on this piece:

•SAFE agenda vs. welfare state, striking a balance, or rebooting the economy? Feedback please! http://bit.ly/Rucudb [Political System page]

William Whipple III, President, SAFE

This message was also sent to Senator Coons & Representative Carney.

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092412
SECURE AMERICA’S FUTURE ECONOMY, advocating smaller, more focused, less costly government since 1996, now you can follow us on Twitter 

September 24, 2012

Dear Senator Carper:

The recent News Journal series of essays (including yours) on the Constitution missed the 800-pound gorilla in the living room, namely growing ascendancy of the Executive Branch.

Washington's current problems are not due to partisan gridlock, in our opinion, but rather to a collective tendency to duck important issues – such as cutting wasteful government spending before it sinks the country.  And inaction by Congress should not be used as a pretext for aggressive (if not illegal) administrative actions.

You may find the discussion in our current blog entry of interest.  Here is a summary and the link.

9/24/12 – Reflections on the Constitution at the 225-year mark: support Congress, beware Executive Branch overreach.

William Whipple III, President, SAFE

This message was also sent to Senator Coons & Representative Carney.


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082712
SECURE AMERICA’S FUTURE ECONOMY, advocating smaller, more focused, less costly government since 1996, now you can follow us on Twitter.

August 27, 2012

Dear Senator Carper:

You may have read some of the recent News Journal stories about sea level rise along the Delaware coast and the purported cause (manmade global warming).

In our judgment, these stories (and the associated public forum) exaggerated the threat, ignored the primary cause (coastal land is sinking), and offered “solutions” without any regard for practicality. 

Dissenters seem to be dismissed as misinformed “skeptics,” even though they are typically better informed than their intellectual opponents.  The apparent game plan is to cow the general public into submission and then empower state and federal bureaucrats to do whatever they think is best.

Hopefully, this subject will emerge as a major issue in the November elections.  We would invite you to consider our thoroughly documented critique of the News Journal coverage. [Go to “Secure America’s Future Economy” site, click “blog (weekly)” in directory, scroll down to 8/27/12 entry.]

William Whipple III, President, SAFE

This letter (with the appropriate salutations) was also sent to Senator Coons, Representative Carney, and challengers Kevin Wade & Tom Kovach.

August 28, 2012 response from Rep. John Carney: Thank you for contacting me to share your support for comprehensive energy and climate change legislation. I support the consensus of the scientific community that the global climate is changing, and that man-made greenhouse gas emissions are largely responsible. Climate change is one of the most significant long-term challenges we face: low-lying coastal states like Delaware risk being impacted by changing storm patterns and sea level rise.

It is essential that we find ways to reduce our emissions and mitigate the impacts of climate change without compromising our economic vitality. Job creation and preservation are and will remain my priority as Delaware's Representative. Our energy policies need to promote innovation, keep costs under control, and enhance our competitiveness as a nation.

As you may know, in 2007, the U.S Supreme Court ruled in Massachusetts v. EPA that "greenhouse gases fit well within the Clean Air Act's definition of 'air pollutant.'" Therefore, as required under the Clean Air Act, if the Environmental Protection Agency Administrator determines that public health or welfare is endangered by greenhouse gases then the Administrator must develop regulation for that pollutant. Administrator Lisa Jackson signed two findings in late 2009 regarding greenhouse gases under the Clean Air Act. The first was an "endangerment finding," whereby the Environmental Protection Agency concluded that current and projected atmospheric concentrations of six greenhouse gases, including carbon dioxide, threaten the public health and welfare.

The second finding was a "cause or contribute finding," concluding that the combined emissions of greenhouse gases from new motor vehicles contribute to the greenhouse gas pollution that threatens the public health. This enabled the Environmental Protection Agency, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, and the auto industry to come together to craft new fuel efficiency standards that will reduce emissions, cut billion of barrels in oil consumption, and save consumers $3,000 over the lifetime of their vehicles. The auto industry supported the rule, which creates a uniform federal standard for new vehicles starting in 2012.

On April 8, 2011, the House of Representatives voted to pass H.R. 910, the Energy Tax Prevention Act of 2011, sponsored by Representative Fred Upton (R-MI). The legislation would overturn EPA's endangerment finding, thereby permanently eliminating its ability to regulate carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases under the Clean Air Act. It would also eliminate the Greenhouse Gas Registry, a nationwide system for reporting and tracking major emissions that was drafted by the George W. Bush Administration. Finally, H.R. 910 would unravel the new greenhouse gas-based fuel efficiency standards.

Many policymakers and officials contend that the Clean Air Act would neither be the most efficient nor cost- effective way to regulate this pollutant, and I agree. I remain concerned and will continue closely monitoring EPA's implementation of the stationary source greenhouse gas rule, with an eye on any potential impacts to Delaware. However, I voted against H.R. 910 because it goes too far in preventing action to better understand and address climate change.

Thank you for contacting me with your concerns about greenhouse gas emissions. I take seriously the trust Delawareans have placed in me to represent them in Congress, and I look forward to serving you in the coming years.

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071612
SECURE AMERICA’S FUTURE ECONOMY

Advocating smaller, more focused, less costly government since 1996, now follow us on Twitter

July 16, 2012

Dear Senator Coons:

We would like to share a few thoughts about your 7/13/12 “health policy briefing.”

(http://coons.enews.senate.gov/mail/util.cfm?gpiv=2100091828.5233.101&gen=1

A. The Supreme Court did not rule the 2010 healthcare legislation (GovCare) “is constitutional,” but only that the individual mandate could be construed as a tax that Congress has the power to impose.  Seven justices decided that the federal government cannot withhold all Medicaid funding for states not wishing to expand their Medicaid coverage, but only the incremental funding involved. Five justices concluded that the individual mandate exceeds the power of Congress under the Commerce Clause.

B.  As for what role the Supreme Court should play in our constitutional scheme of things, the Court has at this point essentially abdicated its responsibilities in the economic sphere – which is not what the founders intended.  See Assessing the GovCare decision, Blog 2012 (7/9/12).

C. You mention various purported benefits of GovCare without explaining how much they would cost or who would pay for them.  A discussion of costs vs. benefits would seemingly be relevant in assessing the merits of this legislation, and we fail to understand why it was omitted from a purportedly factual briefing. 

D.  As you know, GovCare may be repealed after the November elections.  Should this happen, we would request that you and your colleagues take a serious look at SAFE’s recommendations for real healthcare reform. http://www.s-a-f-e.org/healthcare.htm

Sincerely,

William Whipple III, President
Secure America’s Future Economy

CC: Senator Tom Carper, Representative John Carney

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061812
Secure America’s Future Economy (SAFE)

Advocating smaller, more focused, less costly government since 1996 http://www.s-a-f-e.org/

June 18, 2012

Via e-mail: Dear Senator Coons: [letter also sent to Senator Carper & Representative Carney]

A US Supreme Court ruling on the Affordable Care Act of 2010 (GovCare) is due by the end of the month, and there is good reason to believe at least part of this legislation will be found unconstitutional. 

This seems like a good time for reflection on how GovCare was enacted in the first place and what the best course of action will be going forward.   Our analysis has just been posted, and we thought you might find it of interest.

• GovCare saga: a botched “reform” effort, our predictions re Supreme Court decision, and what’s after that. Blog page of SAFE website (6/18/12)

Please let me know if you have any questions or we can help further.

William Whipple III, President

PS: On the blog page, you can click the Twitter icon (at the top) to sample some of our other recent posts (on both national and Delaware issues).  If the “tweets” look interesting, please consider following SAFE on Twitter.  We would be pleased to reciprocate by following you.

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050812
Secure America’s Future Economy (SAFE)

Advocating smaller, more focused, less costly government since 1996

LINK ONE (see below)

May 8, 2012

Via Fax: Representatives Boehner, Pelosi, Brady, Camp, Cantor, Carney, Dicks, Hensarling, Levin, Rogers, Ryan, & Van Hollen; Senators Reid, McConnell, Baucus, Carper, Casey, Coburn, Cochran, Conrad, Coons, Cornyn, Hatch, Inouye, Kyl, Murray, Rubio, Sessions, Toomey, & Wyden

We have repeatedly contacted you and others about the coming fiscal crisis, as in our 3/7/12 letter urging (A) the adoption of a responsible budget for fiscal year 2013, and (B) an overhaul of the US tax system.  If these issues are left for a lame duck Congress to address after the election, the results will almost certainly be unsatisfactory.

The House has now passed a budget package that would represent a major step forward and deserves serious consideration.  It has also endorsed the idea of a tax overhaul although the House Ways and Means Committee needs to flesh out the details; see SAFE’s SimpleTax proposal (LINK TWO) for our ideas.

The Senate leadership reportedly intends to stonewall the House budget without proposing any alternative, thus ensuring nothing will get done before the election. 

The fiscal problem is serious business and no one knows when the roof will cave in.  The time has come for less fancy footwork and a lot more action!

As explained by Senator Tom Coburn in his just published book, “careerism” is the root problem.  “The Debt Bomb” deserves to be read by every member of Congress and their respective staffs.  Our review is posted on SAFE’s website.  LINK THREE

Can Americans count on you to do the right thing?

Sincerely,

William Whipple III

LINK ONE – Search for Secure America’s Future Economy, select SAFE homepage

 http://www.s-a-f-e.org/ (follow us on Twitter)

LINK TWO – Homepage, Taxes, select SimpleTax memo

http://www.s-a-f-e.org/the_simple_tax.htm

LINK THREE – Homepage, Book reviews, select most recent 2012 review

http://www.s-a-f-e.org/Book%20Reviews/debt_bomb.htm

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032612
Secure America’s Future Economy

Advocating smaller, more focused, less costly government since 1996 

March 26, 2012

Individually addressed letters, with indicated messages, sent via fax:

A. Representatives Paul Ryan, House Budget Committee chairman, and Dave Camp, House Ways and Means Committee chairman:

We would like to congratulate you, Representative [Dave Camp or Paul Ryan], and the members of your respective committees for the House budget proposal that was unveiled last week.

Implementing this plan will not be easy, especially before the election, but a lot of people are rooting for you.  Here is our analysis of the opposing arguments.

Blog 2012 3/26/12 – House budget opponents circle the wagons; their arguments are weak, but they won’t give in easily.

Please advise if there is anything we can do to help.

B. Representative Chris Van Hollen, ranking minority member of the House Budget Committee:

We think the House Budget proposal represents an overdue reaction to the reckless expansion of government, which has brought this nation to the brink of a financial disaster. 

It is disappointing that, as noted in our blog entry, you seem to want to disassociate yourself and the members of your party from this initiative.

Blog 2012 3/26/12 – House budget opponents circle the wagons; their arguments are weak, but they won’t give in easily.

Hopefully, for the good of the country, you will reconsider.

C. Senator Tom Carper, Senator Chris Coons, and Representative John Carney, from Delaware:

We think the House Budget proposal represents an overdue reaction to the reckless expansion of government, which has brought this country to the brink of a financial disaster. 

The defensive reaction of political opponents is disappointing.  One might conclude that they are more concerned about their political agendas than about finding the best solutions to a grave national problem.

Blog 2012 3/26/12 – House budget opponents circle the wagons; their arguments are weak, but they won’t give in easily.

We hope that you and other Democrats who have a serious interest in solving the fiscal problem will give this report the serious consideration that it deserves.

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030712
Secure America’s Future Economy

Advocating smaller, more focused, less costly government since 1996


March 7, 2012

UNFINISHED BUSINESS

With soaring government spending and trillion dollar annual deficits, the United States is hurtling towards a disastrous fiscal meltdown.  Something must done – but what? 

Recent discussions of government spending levels have focused on across-the-board caps, the elimination of “fraud, waste and abuse,” etc., as though all government programs were meritorious.  The premise is false (some programs are a waste of money; others may actually be underfunded), however, and generalized budget controls never work for long.

Our advice would be to go after specific targets, and in a nearly $4 trillion annual budget there are many possibilities. For example: (1) the Department of Energy has made no progress towards energy independence in over 30 years - get rid of it; (2) agricultural subsidies and corporate welfare programs benefit generally prosperous recipients at the expense of the nation as a whole; (3) the states can run their own school systems without federal supervision; (4) Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid must be restructured so these programs will be affordable over the long haul; (5) the 2010 healthcare legislation should be repealed, making way for reforms that would empower patients and their doctors instead of government bureaucrats. http://www.s-a-f-e.org/spendiing.htm

Some say it will be necessary to raise taxes as well, but we would urge every effort to cut spending first.  Experience shows that (A) tax increases are used as an excuse to defer unwelcome spending cuts, and (B) higher tax rates and/or new levies often produce less tax revenue than expected.

This is not to oppose change. The current tax system is a complicated mess, featuring high rates, double taxation of some business income, and a mindboggling assortment of breaks for individuals and businesses meeting the specified requirements.

It would be relatively easy to streamline the system, making it more efficient and economically neutral.  Tax rates could be substantially lowered, yet still bring in more revenue by lessening the drag effect on the economy.  See our SimpleTax proposal.  http://www.s-a-f-e.org/the_simple_tax.htm

Are our spending and tax ideas too “radical” for consideration in an election year?  Congress did very little in 2011 except for clearing a $2.1 trillion debt limit increase, however, and the fiscal problem is too urgent to defer year after year.  It is time to act! 

The president’s latest budget proposal shows large deficits and rising debt for the next decade despite rosy economic assumptions. Projected deficit reduction ($3 trillion net) assumes major tax increases for the well to do and defense cuts. Discretionary domestic spending would actually increase versus baseline, and mandatory spending cuts amount to technical tinkering. Blog 2012 (2/20/12)

1. We hope the House will develop a more responsible budget, as it did in 2011, and the Senate will seriously consider the House’s budget instead of ducking again.  The Senate’s failure to approve a budget since 2009 has not gone unnoticed.  

Although labeled as “reforms,” the president’s tax proposals are misguided. They would raise effective tax rates in many cases and further complicate a system already tottering under its own weight. Blog 2012 (2/27/12)

2. We would encourage the House Ways and Means Committee to get cracking on a serious tax overhaul instead of marking time until November. Maybe the Senate would get on board, maybe not, but at least the voters would know where the two parties stand on tax policy, e.g., the “fair share” of taxes to be paid by high, average, and lower income individuals, when they cast their ballots.

Finally, opinion polls show Congressional approval ratings are in the basement and a majority of Americans believe this country is headed in the wrong direction.  Some observers say this reflects a deepening of the partisan divide, which works against compromising differences to get things done.

Harmony is a good thing, all other things being equal, but there is no reason to believe the budget can be balanced by “splitting the difference” between the two party’s fiscal goals.  What good is compromise when neither party has demonstrated an adequate sense of urgency about cutting spending or reforming the tax system?

We also doubt voters are disillusioned with Congress simply because the members do not “play nice.”  The real point, in our opinion, is a public perception that the nation’s political leaders are obsessed with staying in office versus making the best decisions for the nation. 

This is not merely conservative rhetoric. Harvard Law School (hardly a bastion of conservatism) Professor Robert Bordone painted a similar picture in a National Journal interview last December.  “It seems like instead of thinking what would be good for the American people or the nation,” he said, “[politicians] are thinking what will be good for my election.” Blog 2012 (3/5/12)

3. We would urge the members of Congress to think outside the box.  How about having a serious, on the record review of what government programs should be eliminated, how entitlement programs should be restructured, and what the tax system should look like, if this nation is to avert catastrophe.

It would not be possible to settle all of these issues in 2012, of course, but perhaps the members could make a down payment on the problems that have been allowed to accumulate over the past half century.

4. As for the voters, they must start paying more attention to what is going on in Washington if they truly hope America’s best days lie ahead.  Otherwise, they will inevitably be disappointed.

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020112
Secure America’s Future Economy
Advocating smaller, more focused, less costly government since 1996

February 1, 2012

To: MEMBERS OF CONGRESS

From: SAFE

Did the White House speechwriters stumble across our “to do” list for Congress (1/16/12 blog entry) and decide to contradict every point in the State of the Union address?  Probably not, but they might as well have, because the two messages are irreconcilable. 

Having thoughtfully considered what the president had to say, we would urge you to get started on SAFE’s list – right away!  Here are our proposals again, updated to reflect the SOTU remarks and other recent developments.

1. Extend the payroll tax cut for the remainder of this year – it’s a bad idea, but a deal is a deal – with appropriate offsets to minimize the fiscal damage.  Perhaps something can be done about limiting unemployment benefits; 99 weeks is too long!

2. Recess appointments are a historical anachronism, and presidents of both parties have abused this privilege.  It’s time for Congress to stop the games by proposing a Constitutional amendment to terminate Article II, Section 2, Paragraph 3.   

3. Approve a budget for fiscal year 2013, hopefully cutting spending in the process.  We cannot imagine why Congress has stopped complying with its own budget rules and seems to have so little concern about running up the National Debt.

4. Don’t argue about the expiring Bush tax cuts in December; overhaul the tax system now.  Revenue should be collected in a manner that is simple, efficient, and fair.  Our tax plan (http://www.s-a-f-e.org/the_simple_tax.htm) may represent a useful template.

For discussion and references, see SAFE offers DC a “to do” list for 2012 (1/16/12) and SOTU finesses fiscal responsibility (1/30/12).    Blog 2012,

If we can help further, please let me know.

Respectfully,

William Whipple III, President
Secure America’s Future Economy

(302) 464-2688

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011812
Secure America’s Future Economy
Advocating smaller, more focused, less costly government since 1996 

January 18, 2012

Copies to: Senators Reid & McConnell, members of Senate Finance Committee; Representatives Boehner & Pelosi, members of House Ways and Means Committee; members of Congress from Delaware

Congress’s most notable action in 2011 was to set the conditions for a $2.1 trillion increase in the national debt.  We would like to suggest a four-point “to do” list that might help to make 2012 a better year.  Each of the items will likely be addressed anyway, so why not tackle them in a timely and systematic manner? 

1. Extend the payroll tax cut for the remainder of this year – a bad idea in principle, but a deal is a deal – with appropriate offsets to minimize the fiscal damage.  Action is required by the end of February.  We would hope the president will make the deal more palatable by giving a “green light” to the Keystone XL Pipeline.

2. Address the recess appointment issue in a constructive manner.  As we see it, the most promising approach would be for Congress to propose a Constitutional amendment to terminate Article II, Section 2, Paragraph 3. Legislators on both sides of the aisle should support such an amendment as a means of maintaining respect for Congress as an institution.  

3. Approve a budget for fiscal year 2013 in compliance with the Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974.  Not only should Congress comply with its own budget rules, as it has failed to do for several years, but the discipline of developing a budget might prove helpful in achieving some significant spending cuts.

4. Start work to overhaul the tax system instead of waiting until December to decide what to do about the expiring Bush tax cuts and quite possibly making some bad decisions under time pressure.  Piecemeal consideration of tax law changes is inherently inefficient, and has contributed to degradation of the system over time.

For discussion and references, see “SAFE offers DC a ‘to do’ list for 2012,” Blog 2012 (1/16/12).  We would be pleased to respond to any questions you may have.

Respectfully,

William Whipple III, President
Secure America’s Future Economy

(302) 464-2688

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